City of Mobile has new tool to tackle blight thanks to newly signed law

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The City of Mobile has a new tool in the fight against blight after a bill sponsored by Mobile-Democrat State Rep. Adline Clarke was signed into law by Governor Kay Ivey.

The new law allows Class 2 municipalities — the City of Mobile is the state’s only Class 2 municipality — to address and remove inoperable vehicles as public nuisances that are on private property that contribute to blighted neighborhoods.

“I’m proud to have sponsored and fought for this legislation which provides the city an important new tool in our continuing fight against blight,” said Clarke. “Working together, we can keep the progress going.”

For purposes of this act, the term “inoperable motor vehicle” refers to  any motor vehicle, trailer, or semi-trailer that has remained on private property and in view of the general public for 30 days or any greater period fixed by the municipality and is inoperable in that one or more of its major mechanical components, including, but not limited to, engine, transmission, drive train, or wheels, are missing or are not functional, or the vehicle otherwise constitutes a nuisance.

HB127 is the latest of Clarke’s efforts to improve life in Mobile.

During last year’s session, she was part of the coalition who successfully fought for restoring the Historic Tax Credit program, which has had a tremendously positive impact for the City on both commercial and residential projects.

“I greatly appreciate Rep. Clarke’s leadership on this important legislation which will be of great assistance in our ongoing work to better our neighborhoods,” said Council Vice President Levon Manzie.

HB127 was signed into law by Ivey late last week.

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1 Comment

  1. Truly amazing the leaders of Mobile had to obtain statewide legislation signed by the new Governor before they could take positive action to remove junk. Law only applies to “Class 2” municipalities. Interesting Mobile is the state’s only Class 2 municipality…. So a state law that applies to a single city….
    Although I would hope city council and Mayor would have exercised some initiative and took care of the business rather than pushing it to the Governor. Guess this way, Mobile “leaders” can point to those lawmakers in Montgomery rather than looking in a mirror.
    The new law takes great pains to describe what constitutes a nuisance.

    “For purposes of this act, the term “inoperable motor vehicle” refers to any motor vehicle, trailer, or semi-trailer that has remained on private property and in view of the general public for 30 days or any greater period fixed by the municipality and is inoperable in that one or more of its major mechanical components, including, but not limited to, engine, transmission, drive train, or wheels, are missing or are not functional, or the vehicle otherwise constitutes a nuisance”.
    The thing that makes me wonder is the part that says “or the vehicle otherwise constitutes a nuisance”. Just curious what does that actually mean and who makes the determination? Granted, expect most of these vehicles, trailers, etc., need to be removed, but if someone in the municipality decides your vehicle constitutes a nuisance, it may be taken and shredded. I could be wrong, but I don’t think so….

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