Grant announcements: Kay Ivey announces over a million awarded through 5 grants this week

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Kay Ivey
[Photo Credit: AP Photo]

Money for law enforcement and for the victims of human trafficking and domestic violence. This week Governor Kay Ivey announced the following grants:

  1. Ivey has awarded a $165,405 grant to ensure that law enforcement and prosecutors are familiar with existing and new laws involving traffic safety.

The Alabama Office of Prosecution Services will use the funds to help district attorneys and law enforcement officers stay up-to-date on traffic safety laws which could affect outcomes for traffic violation cases.

“Law enforcement officers and prosecutors at all levels work together to enforce and uphold Alabama’s traffic laws,” Gov. Ivey said. “I am pleased to support this program which strengthens that partnership and makes sure drivers who break our laws and put others in danger are held accountable for their behavior.”

The Office of Prosecution Services provides training for the state’s 42 district attorneys and their legal staff who prosecute traffic cases. The Office of Prosecution Services also provides needed research and technical assistance in traffic cases.

The office also coordinates with other agencies to discuss methods and strategies to reduce impaired driving and other measures to improve safety on Alabama’s roads.

The Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs is administering the grant from funds made available by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

“ADECA shares Gov. Ivey’s commitment to helping Alabama’s law enforcement officers and prosecutors fully enforce Alabama’s traffic codes and laws,” ADECA Director Kenneth Boswell said.

Gov. Ivey notified Barry Matson, executive director of the Office of Prosecution Services, that the grant had been approved.

ADECA administers an array of programs supporting law enforcement and traffic safety, economic development, energy conservation, water resource management and recreation development.    

2. Gov. Kay Ivey has awarded $1.2 million in grants to provide extra enforcement of Alabama’s traffic safety laws and make the state’s roadways safer.

The Alabama Law Enforcement Agency will use the grants to provide additional patrols and overtime in specific locations that are shown to be problem areas for speeding and drunken driving.

“Obeying Alabama’s traffic laws – following speed limits, buckling up and not driving impaired or distracted – saves lives,” Gov. Ivey said. “I commend our state troopers at ALEA for the work they do to make our roadways safe for all drivers, and I am pleased to provide these funds for extra enforcement in problem areas.”

While many people are familiar with nationwide enforcement campaigns such as “Click It or Ticket” or “Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over,” these grants allow ALEA to target these problem areas, known as “hot spots,” at various times throughout the year as needed.

The Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs is administering the grants from funds made available by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

“ADECA stands with Gov. Ivey in commending our state troopers for their dedication and hard work to save lives on Alabama’s highways,” ADECA Director Kenneth Boswell said.

ADECA administers a wide range of programs that support law enforcement, economic development, water resource management, energy conservation and recreation development.

Gov. Ivey notified ALEA Secretary Hal Taylor that the grants had been approved.

3. Alabama’s focus to take dangerous drivers off the road just became a little sharper thanks to a $315,578 grant awarded by Gov. Kay Ivey.

The Alabama Law Enforcement Agency will use the funds to continue its drug recognition expert program. Officers trained as drug experts can recognize motorists who are under the influence of prescribed medications or illegal drugs.

“Drivers under the influence of drugs or other substances recklessly endanger lives when they get behind the wheel,” Gov. Ivey said. “This program gives us a valuable tool to take dangerous drivers off the road and hold them accountable.”

Drug recognition training involves knowing when a motorist is driving under the influence of drugs and learning how to differentiate between drug substances and alcohol. Training also helps officers determine if an erratic motorist who has been stopped or is in a crash is suffering from a mental disorder or a medical condition.     

 The Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs is administering the grant from funds made available to the state by the U.S. Department of Justice.

“Gov. Ivey and ADECA are committed to providing the tools, knowledge and resources to keep our roads safe and ensure that drivers depart and arrive at their destinations safely,” ADECA Director Kenneth Boswell said.

ADECA administers a wide range of programs that support law enforcement, victim programs, economic development, water resource management, energy conservation and recreation.

4) Gov. Kay Ivey has awarded $1 million to help victims of sex trafficking find safe shelter and receive the needed guidance to restore their lives.

The WellHouse will use the funds to provide a safe residential haven for women who have been sexually exploited through human trafficking and are seeking help. The nonprofit agency based near Birmingham provides multiple services to help women escape trafficking situations.

“Many women, no matter their background or upbringing, can become trapped in illicit sex trafficking,” Gov. Ivey said.  “It important that our state supports efforts that help liberate these women caught in that unfortunate circumstance. I am proud to aid programs that help those women.”

The agency provides a five-step recovery process that helps deliver women from being sexually exploited victims to becoming independent survivors. The WellHouse has a 24-hour availability and works with law enforcement agencies and other agencies to help women escape sex trafficking and obtain needed physical and mental health care, education and job skills and legal advocacy.

The Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs is administering the grant from funds made available to the state by the U.S. Department of Justice.

“Gov. Ivey and ADECA are committed to helping women escape the chains of human trafficking and receive the services and guidance they require to recover and regain their dignity,” ADECA Director Kenneth Boswell said.

Gov. Ivey notified Al Worthington, The WellHouse board president, that the grant had been approved. The WellHouse also relies on private contributions to ensure that victims receive a full range of services.

ADECA administers a wide range of programs that support law enforcement, victim programs, economic development, water resource management, energy conservation and recreation.

5) Gov. Kay Ivey has awarded a $390,599 grant to support the Alabama Coalition Against Rape, a nonprofit organization that assists victims of sexual violence and conducts outreach and education to prevent others from being victimized.

The Coalition has provided legal, medical and counseling services to victims throughout Alabama since 1995. The organization is made up of more than a dozen agencies that provide regional services for victims.

The coalition also provides training for allied professionals and networks and maintains connections with other agencies to assist victims and address sexual violence issues.

“Professional help is always available for anyone who has been a victim of sexual assault,” Gov. Ivey said. “I commend the Alabama Coalition Against Rape for their work in improving services for victims of these terrible crimes and for their outreach work in helping to prevent these crimes.”

The Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs is administering the grant from funds made available by the U.S. Department of Justice.

“ADECA joins Gov. Ivey in commending the Alabama Coalition Against Rape for the important work they do to ensure that victims of these awful crimes receive the care and support they need in their recovery,” ADECA Director Kenneth Boswell said.

Along with grants, the Coalition and its member agencies rely on private donations to ensure that these services remain available year-round.

Gov. Ivey notified Chandra Brown, the Coalition’s board president, that the grant had been approved.

ADECA administers a wide range of programs that support law enforcement, victims services, economic development, water resource management, energy conservation and recreation development.