Trussville City Council President Anthony Montalto seeks to oust 20-year incumbent

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Trussville Mayor Eugene (Gene) Melton has served for 20 years, five full terms to date. While he hasn’t formally announced he is running for re-election he has stiff completion if or when he does.

Anthony Montalto, now City Council president, has decided it’s time for a change, and formally launched his campaign this week.

“I’ve lived in the city of Trussville for more than 28 years. Over the past decade, it’s been exciting to see Trussville cultivate into one of the fastest growing cities in the state,” said Montalto. “I have decided to run for Mayor because I believe the next four to eight years are crucial for our city. We are at a pivotal crossroads, and this is especially true in relation to strategic planning.”Montalto_2

Montalto’s background is in education. He works for the Jefferson County School system as director of Student Services. Prior to that he was principal and assistant principal aqt several local schools including Hewitt-Trussville High School and Hewitt-Trussville Middle School.

According to his campaign kick-off announcement Montalto would focus on three sustainability measures if elected mayor:

  1. Create and execute a Strategic Plan for the City, including a detailed vision for economic development.
  1. Work with the leaders of the Trussville City School system to ensure high education standards are maintained in a safe, nurturing environment.
  1. Build more lines of communication with Trussville residents including holding more town hall meetings and utilizing social media channels to voice concerns and ideas.

Montalto has stated that he plans to roll out more specific details about his platform over the next six months and will host “Ask Anthony” sessions at the Parish Seafood & Oyster House every first Monday of the month at 5:30 p.m., beginning in February.

According the Trussville Tribune, an ordinance passed in 2014 means that beginning with the August 2016 election the mayor will see an increase yearly salary from $60,000 to $75,600.

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